02.01.2013

LO MAGAZINE INTERVIEW

LO MAGAZINE INTERVIEWS BRETT CODY ROGERS

11.23.2012

YOUR HISTORY IS OUR HISTORY (CURATED BY RENE-JULIEN PRAZ)

PRAZ-DELAVALLADE

November 23, 2012 - January 5, 2013

Opening Reception: 17:00-20:00, November 23, 2012

Edgar Arceneaux, John Baldessari, Andrea Bowers, Jeff Burton, Guy de Cointet, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Jean-Gabriel Domergue, Sam Durant, Peter Harkawik, Julian Hoeber, Jim Isermann, Cameron Jamie, Mike Kelley, Joel Kyack, Nathan Mabry, Paul McCarthy, Raymond Pettibon, Ry Rocklen, Brett Cody Rogers, Wayne Rowe, Allen Ruppersberg, Ed Ruscha, Analia Saban, Jim Shaw, Marnie Weber

09.20.2012

ART PLATFORM - LOS ANGELES / GALERIE PRAZ-DELAVALLADE

ART PLATFORM - LOS ANGELES

Art Platform 2012 - September 27 / 30
At the Barker Hanger
Santa Monica, CA

Praz-Delavallade booth 113

Works by Edgar Arceneaux, Amy Bessone, Andrea Bowers, Sam Durant, Julian Hoeber, Jim Isermann, Nathan Mabry, Brett Cody Rogers, Analia Saban, Jim Shaw and Marnie Weber

09.06.2012

WHO DESIGNED MY SNOWBOARD'S TOPSHEET?

OUTSIDE ONLINE

By: Bob Parks

08.13.2012

BURTON SNOWBOARDS LAUNCHES 2013 CUSTOM X LINE FEATURING PAINTINGS BY BRETT CODY ROGERS

05.23.2012

FvF INTERVIEWS: BRETT CODY ROGERS
ARTIST, HOUSE AND STUDIO, LOS ANGELES, LOS FELIZ

FREUNDE VON FREUNDEN (FVF)

ZEIT ONLINE

Interview: David John
Photos: Ailine Liefeld

05.18.2012

TOMORY DODGE

EXPLOSIONS, FAILURES, MISTAKES

BRETT CODY ROGERS

FLASH ART #284 MAY-JUNE 2012

Brett Cody Rogers: You grew up on the Eastern slope of Colorado. How do you think the mountains and planes of Colorado influenced your work? Did the deserts of California remind you of Denver when you first moved to Los Angeles?

Tomory Dodge: I remember as a kid the mountains being omnipresent. They seemed to be very central to the “official culture” of the place. I think for that reason I was kind of fascinated by Eastern Colorado. It’s flat, dry as a bone and generally empty. The mountains are inarguably stunning, but they were a known quantity in a way. Kids grew up knowing the names of all the famous ones. No one thought much about the flat parched wasteland to the east. I kind of found myself drawn there. Not physically but I would fantasize more about that type of landscape for some reason. When I found my self in California I kind of did a similar thing. Instead of being drawn to the coast I was drawn to the desert, and that’s where so many of those early paintings came from.

BCR: Did you blow a lot of things up when you were a kid?
TD: No, my younger brother did more of that. I really spent most of my time drawing, battle scenes and things like that. I did draw a lot of explosions.

BCR: How is paint like an explosion?
TD: I guess for me it kind of comes dow
n to a type of metamorphosis. Material is being transformed from a known recognizable object to an unrecognizable object. Gravity is being suspended or temporarily reversed. I think this is demonstrated to great effect at the end of Michelangelo Antonioni’s film Zabriskie Point (1970) where everyday objects are shown exploding in extremely slow motion. It becomes dreamlike, almost euphoric. In a way those scenes are very painterly to me. There’s long been the association with abstract painting and the disaster.

BCR: I think we would be overlooking something if we did not talk about Gerhard Richter in relation to this new work. More so in the smaller works like Sio’n (2011), August (2011) and Piano Player (2011) than in the larger works. There seems to me to be a real interest on your part in the ability of paint to be both photographic and painterly.
TD: There is a similarity in those paintings to some Richter works; certain earlier abstract paintings of his that seem to be done on top of photographic work especially come to mind. But in my case I don’t think there is an interest in photography. I’ve never made many of what I think of as “proper” photographs, and I stopped using photos as source material years ago. I’m more interested in representation in general. I think in the case of Richter he is really trying to make a photograph out of paint. The mechanical indifference in his work, the blurring, the scraping, is a stand in for the machinery of the camera itself. I’m more interested in the idea of paint being itself as well as something else. Photography enters into it on some level, but it’s not integral to my work.

BCR: For a while now your paintings have possessed a quality that I would associate with backlighting — or, they appear to be internally lit from an artificial source. Rarely do things appear to be front-lit. It seems like there is always a light behind the “subject,” and the subject is almost always the plastic nature of paint. Beyond the chaos there often seems to be a light at the end of the tunnel, be it a sunset, a night sky or an expansive color field. Are you an eternal optimist?
TD: I don’t really feel like much of an optimist usually, but who knows. Again, I think this all goes back to representation. One of the central aspects to traditional Western painting has been the depiction of light. It was central to a lot of the earlier representational paintings I made, and when things started to become more abstract I stayed interested in it. I should say, I never really decided to make abstract paintings as opposed to representational ones. The whole distinction seems less and less relevant really, but it keeps coming up. It’s like that absence of a named object is still a big deal for people. There is something that is really elementally profound about saying a painting depicts a duck and having other people look at it and agree with you. It’s almost like there is a switch in the brain that’s in one position when you connect an image to a named thing and in another position when you don’t. Two different modes of viewing are utilized. I guess I don’t see why that’s necessary. I’ve always wanted to make paintings that present themselves both ways at the same time. That’s why there are often these depictions of light and space that point in one direction and a materiality that points in another.

BCR: Recently I wrote about your work in relation to Abstract Expressionist painters like Philip Guston and Willem de Kooning. I referred to you as a “war-time painter” making work after the “postwar painters.” The main difference being the context that we are now in. But also that your work has a self-consciousness that wasn’t possible in postwar painting because that type of abstraction was in its infancy.
TD: I think that’s generally true for all painting now. It’s not historically accurate, but I often carry around the notion that abstract painting really came into its own during the postwar period and then kind of went away in the ’60s and ’70s, and then began to be reevaluated by painters of later generations. One question I kept having had to do with the potential for contemporary abstraction to be relevant outside its art-historical context. In other words, so much of the relevance of postwar abstraction, and postwar art in general, was its newness. And while there was plenty of existential angst in the equation, the newness embodied the optimism of the time. So much of the impact that this work had was rooted in the sense that it had not been done before or seen before. How does abstraction maintain relevance to its own time when the initial sensation of its impact is gone? It’s a question for painting, but also for art in general. You can make an abstract painting that would be earth-shattering in 1950, but now it may just be a nice painting. I started with what was around. Explosions, failures, mistakes seem to be very central to our age. In the end, I think this self-consciousness is unavoidable.

BCR: I’ve seen the speed with which you make paintings. The sense of urgency to complete a picture in one or two sittings seemed to enhance the chaos in the work. This new work seems the result of you taking more time. Especially in paintings like Sleepless (2011) where the mirroring effect of manually copying the paint marks from one half of the painting to the other seems to take more time and organization.
TD: I guess there is more organization, but not much. The process has slowed down a lot. They take much longer to do now. I would hate to think that they seem more orderly or less chaotic because of that. To me they seem more so. Hopefully I’ve been able to integrate that sense of chaos into the painting process itself to a much deeper degree so it’s not just dependent on something like speed. The whole mirroring process in the diptychs has a lot to do with that. One of the reasons I started working that way was that I saw it as a way to really slow the work down. It’s takes longer when you have to do everything twice of course. But I also liked the fact that I could work slowly and still make nothing but mistakes. The idea of copying a gestural mark is absurd on many levels, and in reality it’s not really possible. The results are paintings that simultaneously propose to be symmetrical, but are made in a way that guarantees that they won’t ever really be.

Brett Cody Rogers is an artist based in Los Angeles.

Tomory Dodge was born in 1974 in Denver (US). He lives and works in Los Angeles.

Selected solo shows: 2012: Monica De Cardenas, Zuoz (CH); ACME., Los Angeles. 2011: CRG, New York. 2010: Alison Jacques, London. 2009: CRG, New York; ACME., Los Angeles. 2008: CRG, New York. 2007: Alison Jacques, London; ACME., Los Angeles. 2006: Knoxville Museum of Art (US); CRG, New York. 2004: ACME., Los Angeles; Taxter and Spengemann, New York.
Selected group shows: 2012: “To Live and Paint in LA,” Torrance Art Museum (US). 2011: “Visions,” Monica De Cardenas, Milan. 2010: “Library of Babel/In and Out of Place,” 176/Zabludowicz Collection, Camden (UK). 2008: “Art on Paper,” Weatherspoon Art Museum, Greensboro (US). 2007: “American Soil,” Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Overland Park (US). 2005: “Rogue Wave,” LA Louver, Venice (US). 2004: “Supersonic,” Art Center College of Design, Pasadena (US). 2003: “Lordship and Bondage,” LeRoy Neiman Gallery, Columbia University, New York

03.26.2012

HILARIA! MATERIAL'S THIRD ANNUAL ART AUCTION TO BENEFIT ISSUE 3
MATERIAL

I've donated a framed work on paper to the auction to benefit MATERIAL. The work is now up for bid in the silent auction now through Friday March 30th 5PM.

The live auction takes place on April Fools Eve, March 31st, 2012 at 'The End' / 5502 Monte Vista Street, Los Angeles, CA 90042. Doors open 8pm, auction from 8:30-10:30.

03.14.2012

WORK DONATED TO MOCA FRESH AUCTION
MOCA

I've donated a framed photograph, edition 1 of 5 to the auction to benefit MOCA. The auction takes place this Saturday March 24th at 2PM @ MOCA Grand Avenue, Los Angeles.

Please come out to the event in support of MOCA. More info at MOCA.org

01.25.2012

ALAC, L'ARTE INNOVATIVA A LOS ANGELES È ANCHE VIRTUALE
Grazia Italy

01.22.2012

BRETT CODY ROGERS' INSTALLATION AT ALAC
You Have Been Here Sometime (YHBHS)

HAPPENING | PADDLE8 + PHAIDON BOOTH AT ALAC, PART 2
Paddle8 Scroll Blog

ALAC - ART LOS ANGELES CONTEMPORARY
Flash Art Online

01.20.2012

BRETT CODY ROGERS INTERPRETS LE CORBUSIER
Phaidon.com

HAPPENING | PADDLE8 + PHAIDON BOOTH AT ALAC, PART 1
Paddle8 Scroll Blog

Two great blog posts on the study / booth I designed for Paddle8 and Phaidon for the Art Los Angeles Contemporary art fair happening this weekend at the Barker Hanger in Santa Monica.

09.16.2011

TAKE AN ABSTRACT OBJECT AND MAKE IT FALL APART: PAINTER'S FORMS AT PEPIN MOORE
Notes on Looking

Thanks to Geoff Tuck for the write up on Painter's Forms!

09.02.2011

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Pepin Moore

Brett Cody Rogers | Painter's Forms
17 September - 22 October 2011

Pepin Moore | 933 Chung King Road | Los Angeles | California | 90012

Opening reception: Saturday, September 17th, 7:00 - 9:00 pm
Gallery hours: Wednesday - Saturday, 12:00 - 6:00 pm

Pepin Moore is proud to present an exhibition of new works by Brett Cody Rogers. A reception for the artist will be held on Saturday, September 17th from seven to nine in the evening.

The title of the exhibition, Painter's Forms, references Philip Guston's 1972 oil painting of the same title, a painting created during Guston's departure into figurative abstraction that pulls its imagery from materials in and around the studio. Using the materials of painting and painting itself as a subject, Rogers fluidly interlaces painting with photography and film. In his new body of work, painted forms and materials are utilized as backdrops for his photographs and films, and spatial effects captured in his photographs and films are mined as imagery for his paintings.

Rogers' paintings are first composed with a fixed constant, two lines drawn from corner to corner of the painting. The "X" delineating the painting as subject, its edges and boundaries defined at first glance. Then the notations of painting emerge, large washes of vibrating color influenced by materials in the studio, breaks in patterns and shapes from masked lines, and painterly textures from thick to thin applied with brushes and palette knives. These loose shapes and hard geometric abstractions directly reference and are subjects in Rogers' photographs and films.

The photographs in the exhibition are composed as a posthumous collaboration of sorts. Rogers' own burlap and canvas paintings serve as backdrop to maquette sculptures made by the artist's grandfather. These are photographed on a mirrored ground so that all forms flatten out and take on the same patterning and abstraction depicted in his paintings. These silver gelatin prints are then presented in polished aluminum frames further reflecting the mirrored image, and doubling the effect of the photograph as material, image, and referent.

Also included, as a kind of lexicon to the exhibition, are two more key works. First, his own Painter's Forms, a color photograph of the materials and forms used as imagery across all media in the exhibition. And finally, a 16mm film where these forms are strung into a mobile and lit so that the composition of each frame changes as the film traces the mobile's movement.

---
Brett Cody Rogers (b. 1977, Glenwood Springs, CO) received his BFA from Rhode Island School of Design in 1999 and MFA from California Institute of the Arts in 2004. His work has been exhibited internationally at Praz-Delavallade, Berlin and Paris; The Green Gallery, Milwaukee; Aspen Art Museum, Aspen; John Connelly Presents, New York; Swiss Institute, New York; The Approach, London; and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles. Rogers currently lives and works in Los Angeles.

06.15.2011

TALKS ON PAINTING: PAINTERS BEYOND PAINTING
Mandrake Bar

SUNDAY, JUNE 26 7PM

MANDRAKE BAR
2692 South La Cienega Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90034

In Painters Beyond Painting, Tom Lawson, Steve Roden, Brett Cody Rogers, and Amanda Ross-Ho join moderator Jill Newman in a conversation about artists’ relationships to painting when it is one aspect of a multi-faceted practice.In some cases these artists apply the language of painting to various mediums, in others they create paintings through the mechanics of differing disciplines, or arrive at content through subjects outside of painting. Albeit with unique approaches, each artist here balances work in various disciplines with a deep investment and participation in painting discourse.

6.10.2011

UPCOMING SOLO EXHIBITION AT PEPIN MOORE
Pepin Moore

OPENING 17 SEPTEMBER - 22 OCTOBER 2011

PEPIN MOORE / LOS ANGELES
933 Chung King Road
Los Angeles California 90012
+1 213 626 0501

06.21.2010

JUNE GLOOM AT COUNTRY CLUB LOS ANGELES
Country Club

COUNTRY CLUB / LOS ANGELES
805 South Genesee Ave, Los Angeles, CA
JUNE 24-26, 2010
OPENING JUNE 24, 7-9PM

JUNE GLOOM

curated by Fritz Chesnut

John Bauer
Zoe Crosher
Justin Hansch
Zach Harris
Katie Herzog
Matt Luem
Josh Peters
Neill Orje
Brett Cody Rogers
Mary Weatherford

June Gloom focuses on a dark streak running through a pleasant picture. Los Angeles is plagued by this weather pattern each summer which results in cloudy foggy mornings. It's in this quick moment before the sun burns off the clouds that we can revel in gray thoughts and wistful moods.

For additional information please contact:

Country Club
Los Angeles at the Buck House
www.countryclubprojects.com
information@countryclubprojects.com
t +1 323 658 8522

05.07.2010

WORK DONATED TO LACE BENEFIT ART AUCTION 2010
LACE Benefit Art Auction 2010

ONLINE AUCTION BEGINS - 05.07.2010

LIVE AND SILENT AUCTION 05.20.2010, 7-10PM

PURCHASE TICKETS HERE

General $50 advance / $75 door
Silver Circle $500 Duo / $250 Solo (Includes a year's worth of membership benefits.
LACE Bundle $500 (10 tickets)

I've donated a framed drawing for this years LACE benefit. Please support LACE. Bid high and bid often! My donated work will also be part of the Live Auction to take place on 05.20.2010. Special Thanks to Tomory Dodge for curating this work in to the auction.

02.23.2010

THE ARMORY SHOW - 2010 PIER 94
The Armory Show - 2010

Exhibition dates - 03.04.2010 - 03.07.2010

Look for new paintings in the Praz-Delavallade booth.

06.15.2009

GROUP EXHIBITION: DRAWINGS
Praz-Delavallade, Paris, France

Exhibition dates - 06.25.2009 - 07.25.2009
Opening Thursday 25th June 2009
Praz-Delavallade
28, rue Louise Weiss - 75013 Paris

A summer group exhibition of drawings by the gallery's artists; Edgar Arceneaux, Marc Bauer, Amy Bessone, Andrea Bowers, Philippe Decrauzat, Sam Durant, Thomas Fougeirol, Julian Hoeber, Thomas Houseago, John Miller, Robyn O'Neill, Amy O'Neill, Brett Cody Rogers, Analia Saban, Jim Shaw

04.09.2009

GROUP EXHIBITION: LOVABLE LIKE ORPHAN KITTIES AND BASTARD CHILDREN
The Green Gallery East, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Opening 05.09.2009. Curated by Joshua Aster and Kristin Calabrese

“A show unlike any other. Carefully selected from the fertile plains of Los Angeles based painters and brought by plane on a direct flight to the Milwaukee of our dreams. To a forum unlike any other that is The Green Gallery East. All that we desired was each painting to be no larger than ELEVEN inches in either direction. What a dream transport. The treasures received evinced a zeal for this transcontinental project. Wires crossed and envelopes opened, paintings arrived and greetings were made. Faces that shown brightly, seemed to beam brighter. For the sprightly wind that has carried this project into fruition will make its landing on May 9th 2009 at The Green Gallery East.”

- Joshua Aster and Kristin Calabrese

03.23.2009

MUTE NO. 2 THE FACE: STRIPPED
Tanin Inc. Tokyo, Japan

A bi-annual art book published by Tanin inc. Tokyo, Japan. Issue available March, 2009.
Featuring the work of the following artists:

Candice Breitz, Brian Calvin, Merlin Carpenter, Enlightenmnet, Toshiyuki Konishi, Michael Landy, Patrick Lee, Andrea Lehmann, Dan McCarthy, Fiona McMonagle, Harding Meyer, Brett Cody Rogers, Yang Shaobin, Yuichi Yokoyama

03.07.2009

DAZED & CONFUSED MAGAZINE ONLINE
DazedDigital.com

Dazed & Confused Magazine online runs "Hedi Slimane's: LA ART" with an editorial introduction by Bettina Korek.

Story and photos also featured here: Walpaper.com, Ponystep.com, wwd.com

03.03.2009

"LA ART" PORTRAITS BY HEDI SLIMANE
Hedi Slimane Fashion Diary

A series of portraits photographed by Hedi Slimane in February 2009, featuring the following LA-based artists:

Justin Beal, Whitney Bedford, Jedediah Caesar, Brett Cody Rogers, Emilie Halpern, Drew Heitzler, Patrick Hill, Vishal Jugdeo, Elad Lassry, Jed Lind, Shana Lutker, Carter Mull, Kori Newkirk, Anna Sew Hoy, Mindy Shapero, Paul Sietsema, Ricky Swallow, Mateo Tannatt, Lesley Vance